County improvements under way


Roads repaved, properties rehabilitated

By Charles Warner - cwarner@civitasmedia.com



Charles Warner | The Union Daily Times Stepp Road is one of 25 road repaved by Union County this past spring and summer. The repavings are part of a county program that aims to repave county roads each year as part of a larger effort to improve economic development and quality of life in Union County.


By Charles Warner

cwarner@civitasmedia.com

UNION COUNTY — Repaving county roads and clearing and rehabilitating vacant properties is part of Union County’s plans to address economic development and quality of life issues in the community.

During Tuesday’s Union County Council meeting, Supervisor Frank Hart presented his monthly report to council concerning a number of issues facing the county and the steps being taken to address them.

Repaving Efforts

Hart reported that the county, with the support of the Union County Transportation Committee, has completed its resurfacing program for this year.

“We basically resurfaced 25 county roads,” Hart said. “This is the first project of this size done in Union County in many, many, many years. It’s really key to the quality of life and economic development that we maintain our road system.”

Hart said the following roads in the following communities were repaved as part of the project which took place this spring and summer:

• Whitmire — Worthy Road, Hodges Road, Alberta Road, and Candace Circle.

• Union — Stepp Road, Polly Lane, Dewey Circle, Sinclair Dirt Road, Hilltop View, Rook Road, Raymond Road, Meng Creek, Plantation Drive, Sardis School House Road, and Gist Quarters Road.

• Buffalo — Summer Valley Road, Scout Drive, Smith Road, Mitchell Circle, and Short Street.

• Jonesville — Old River Road and Mamie Gault Road.

Hart said that a total of 8.08 miles of road were repaved as part of the project which cost $417,000 of which $400,000 was allocated to the county by the Union County Transportation Committee. He thanked the committee and its

chairman, Don Shetley, for supporting the county’s repaving program by allocating the requested funding.

An important difference between this year’s repaving program is that the county used asphalt which Hart said will last longer.

“In the past we’ve maintained our roads with tar and gravel, which was fine, but it deteriorated rapidly,” Hart said. “We are now putting down asphalt which lasts twenty-plus years.”

Hart said the county is already planning next year’s repaving program with the goal of increasing the number of miles of roads repaved.

“Our goal is to resurface 10 miles of county roads next year,” Hart said.

County Clean-Up

Hart also announced during Tuesday’s meeting that the county plans to begin using Public Works Department personnel together with inmate labor to demolish condemned buildings and clear and rehabilitate the property.

“One of the things I stated when I ran for office is for the county to grow we have to clean it up,” Hart said. “It is an economic development issue and a quality of life issue.”

Hart said that under the plan, Public Works Department personnel working on repaving projects in the spring and summer would be shifted over in the fall and winter to demolishing condemned buildings, clearing away the resulting debris, and then rehabilitating the land it was sitting on. He said they would be assisted by inmate labor which he said would result in a cost savings for the county while also cleaning up and improving unsightly properties.

Plans are for the demolition/clean up/rehabilitation process to get under way before the end of the year.

Enforcement

In addition to its efforts to clear and rehabilitate condemned and abandoned properties, the county is also taking steps to prevent properties from becoming eyesores that can have a negative impact on economic development and quality of life.

The county has signed agreements with the Town of Carlisle and the Town of Lockhart to have the County Building Inspector enforce building codes within those communities. Hart said the county has begun implementing those agreements and providing building inspection and enforcement within both towns.

In addition, Hart said that he is working on getting a grant to hire a Litter Control Officer to tackle the widespread problem of litter in the county which can also negatively impact economic development and quality of life.

Ottaray Mill Village

Another improvement program the county is undertaking is the Ottaray Mill Village Project which seeks to address the needs of that community through a variety of improvements including roads and sewage, curb and gutter, and storm drainage.

One of those improvements is the construction of a community recreational area. Hart told council Wednesday that the county has purchase a parcel of land for the planned facility and that construction is scheduled to begin soon. He said the facility will be a picnic shelter.

Charles Warner can be reached at 864-762-4090 or cwarner@civitasmedia.com.

Charles Warner | The Union Daily Times Stepp Road is one of 25 road repaved by Union County this past spring and summer. The repavings are part of a county program that aims to repave county roads each year as part of a larger effort to improve economic development and quality of life in Union County.
http://uniondailytimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/web1_IMG_00025.jpgCharles Warner | The Union Daily Times Stepp Road is one of 25 road repaved by Union County this past spring and summer. The repavings are part of a county program that aims to repave county roads each year as part of a larger effort to improve economic development and quality of life in Union County.
Roads repaved, properties rehabilitated

By Charles Warner

cwarner@civitasmedia.com

Charles Warner can be reached at 864-762-4090 or cwarner@civitasmedia.com.

Charles Warner can be reached at 864-762-4090 or cwarner@civitasmedia.com.

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