115 attend Statewide Screening Day


Undergo free heart health screenings

By Charles Warner - cwarner@civitasmedia.com



Charles Warner | The Union Times Terrie Allison, RN, takes Maston Hall’s pulse during during the Statewide Screening Day at Union Medical Center on Feb. 18. Hall was among the 115 Union County residents to take part in the free heart health screening and risk assessment offered at the medical center.


Charles Warner | The Union Times Jerry and Kathy Gossett fill out forms during the Statewide Screening Day at Union Medical Center on Feb. 18. They are among the 115 Union County residents to take part in the free heart health screening and risk assessment offered at the medical center.


Charles Warner | The Union Times There was a long line in the main lobby of the Union Medical Center on the morning of Feb. 18 during Statewide Screening Day. The event provided Union County residents with the opportunity to get a free heart health screening and risk assessment. The goal of the event was to educate the public about the realities of heart disease and methods of preventing and managing it. A total of 115 people underwent free heart health screenings and risk assessments at the medical center.


Charles Warner | The Union Times Lori Boyd, RN, uses a finger nick to obtain a blood sample from Nancy O’Dell to be used to check O’Dell’s cholesterol at the Union Medical Center during Statewide Screening Day. The Feb. 18 event was designed to provide local residents with the opportunity to undergo free health screenings and risk assessments as part of an effort to educate the public about heart disease. A total of 115 people underwent free heart health screenings and risk assessments at the medical center.


Charles Warner | The Union Times Juliet Okebe, BSN, takes Bobbie Jean Belue’s blood pressure during the Statewide Screening Day at Union Medical Center on Feb. 18. Belue was among the 115 Union County residents to take part in the free heart health screening and risk assessment offered at the medical center.


UNION — There’s old saying about how “an ounce prevention is worth a pound of cure” and that’s certainly true where heart disease is concerned.

On Thursday, Feb. 18, the main lobby of the Union Medical Center was filled with people filling out forms and waiting in line to each get a free heart health screenings and risk assessment as part of “Statewide Screening Day.”

Statewide Screening Day was a statewide effort by the “Heart 2 Heart Foundation” and health care providers such as the Union Medical Center to educate and inform the public about heart disease.

According to the foundation website (theheart2heartfoundation.org), heart disease “is the number one killer for both men and women in the U.S. and claims more than 600,000 lives each year. In the United States, someone has a heart attack every 34 seconds. Each minute, someone in this country dies from a heart disease-related event. The symptoms of heart disease can be different in women and men, and are often misunderstood.”

Dangerous as heart disease is, the website states that “approximately 80% of the risk factors leading to heart disease can be prevented or managed! That is why it is important to identify your risk factors and to know your numbers: blood pressure, cholesterol, triglycerides, fasting glucose, and body mass index (BMI). This information can help you and your doctor create a plan for your heart health.”

February is Heart Month, and the website states that in recognition of this, the foundation and health care providers such as Union Medical Center would be working together on Statewide Screening Day to help the people of South Carolina “gain a better understanding of their numbers through coordinating heart health screenings in their respective communities. While this effort shines a light on one month of the year, all of the providers listed are committed to early screenings for heart disease throughout the year!”

The screening events held at Union Medical Center and at other health care providers throughout the state are described by the website as including “a check of your cholesterol, blood pressure, BMI, blood glucose and review of your medical/family history and risk factors.”

In Union, a total of 115 people took advantage Statewide Screening Day to undergo the free heart health screenings offered at the medical center. In addition to having their cholesterol and blood pressure and other heart-related vitals screened, participants in the Statewide Screening Day at Union Medical Center could also undergo a carotid artery ultrasound scan. The information gained from such a scan can help prevent strokes.

They were also able to get information on different kinds of food such as red and processed meat, sugar, and junk food and their impact on a person’s health including medical issues such as obesity, high blood pressure, cancer, and, of course, heart disease. They were also able to get information on healthy living including the importance of regular exercise and remaining active and on nutrition including recipes and tips for preparing healthy meals.

Symptoms Of Heart Disease

According to the Mayo Clinic website (www.mayoclinic.org) “heart disease symptoms depend on what type of heart disease you have.

• Symptoms of heart disease in your blood vessels (atherosclerotic disease).

The website states that “cardiovascular disease is caused by narrowed, blocked or stiffened blood vessels that prevent your heart, brain or other parts of your body from receiving enough blood. Cardiovascular disease symptoms may be different for men and women. For instance, men are more likely to have chest pain; women are more likely to have symptoms such as shortness of breath, nausea and extreme fatigue.”

Symptoms can include:

— Chest pain (angina)

— Shortness of breath

— Pain, numbness, weakness or coldness in your legs or arms if the blood vessels in those parts of your body are narrowed

— Pain in the neck, jaw, throat, upper abdomen or back

The website states that “you might not be diagnosed with cardiovascular disease until you have a heart attack, angina, stroke or heart failure. It’s important to watch for cardiovascular symptoms and discuss concerns with your doctor. Cardiovascular disease can sometimes be found early with regular exams.”

• Heart disease symptoms caused by abnormal heartbeats (heart arrhythmias).

The website states that “a heart arrhythmia is an abnormal heartbeat. Your heart may beat too quickly, too slowly or irregularly.”

Symptoms can include:

— Fluttering in your chest

— Racing heartbeat (tachycardia)

— Slow heartbeat (bradycardia)

— Chest pain or discomfort

— Shortness of breath

— Lightheadedness

— Dizziness

— Fainting (syncope) or near fainting

• Heart disease symptoms caused by heart defects.

The website states that “serious congenital heart defects — defects you’re born with — usually become evident soon after birth.”

Heart defect symptoms in children could include:

— Pale gray or blue skin color (cyanosis)

— Swelling in the legs, abdomen or areas around the eyes

— In an infant, shortness of breath during feedings, leading to poor weight gain

The website states that “less serious congenital heart defects are often not diagnosed until later in childhood or during adulthood.”

Signs and symptoms of congenital heart defects that usually aren’t immediately life-threatening include:

— Easily getting short of breath during exercise or activity

— Easily tiring during exercise or activity

— Swelling in the hands, ankles or feet

• Heart disease symptoms caused by weak heart muscle (dilated cardiomyopathy)

The website states that “cardiomyopathy is the thickening and stiffening of heart muscle. In early stages of cardiomyopathy, you may have no symptoms.”

As conditions worsen, however, the website states that symptoms may include:

— Breathlessness with exertion or at rest

— Swelling of the legs, ankles and feet

— Fatigue

— Irregular heartbeats that feel rapid, pounding or fluttering

— Dizziness, lightheadedness and fainting

• Heart disease symptoms caused by heart infections.

The website states that there are three types of heart infections:

— Pericarditis, which affects the tissue surrounding the heart (pericardium)

— Myocarditis, which affects the muscular middle layer of the walls of the heart (myocardium)

— Endocarditis, which affects the inner membrane that separates the chambers and valves of the heart (endocardium)

The website states that “varying slightly with each type of infection,” the symptoms of heart infection symptoms could include:

— Fever

— Shortness of breath

— Weakness or fatigue

— Swelling in your legs or abdomen

— Changes in your heart rhythm

— Dry or persistent cough

— Skin rashes or unusual spots

• Heart disease symptoms caused by valvular heart disease.

The website states that the heart “has four valves — the aortic, mitral, pulmonary and tricuspid valves — that open and close to direct blood flow through your heart. Valves may be damaged by a variety of conditions leading to narrowing (stenosis), leaking (regurgitation or insufficiency) or improper closing (prolapse).”

It further states that “depending on which valve isn’t working properly, valvular heart disease symptoms” include:

— Fatigue

— Shortness of breath

— Irregular heartbeat

— Swollen feet or ankles

— Chest pain

— Fainting (syncope)

• When to see a doctor.

The website states that a person should seek emergency medical care if they have any of these heart disease symptoms:

— Chest pain

— Shortness of breath

— Fainting

“Heart disease is easier to treat when detected early, so talk to your doctor about your concerns about your heart health. If you’re concerned about developing heart disease, talk to your doctor about steps you can take to reduce your heart disease risk. This is especially important if you have a family history of heart disease.

“If you think you may have heart disease, based on new signs or symptoms you’re having, make an appointment to see your doctor.”

Charles Warner | The Union Times Terrie Allison, RN, takes Maston Hall’s pulse during during the Statewide Screening Day at Union Medical Center on Feb. 18. Hall was among the 115 Union County residents to take part in the free heart health screening and risk assessment offered at the medical center.
http://uniondailytimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/web1_Screening-3.jpgCharles Warner | The Union Times Terrie Allison, RN, takes Maston Hall’s pulse during during the Statewide Screening Day at Union Medical Center on Feb. 18. Hall was among the 115 Union County residents to take part in the free heart health screening and risk assessment offered at the medical center.

Charles Warner | The Union Times Jerry and Kathy Gossett fill out forms during the Statewide Screening Day at Union Medical Center on Feb. 18. They are among the 115 Union County residents to take part in the free heart health screening and risk assessment offered at the medical center.
http://uniondailytimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/web1_Screening-1.jpgCharles Warner | The Union Times Jerry and Kathy Gossett fill out forms during the Statewide Screening Day at Union Medical Center on Feb. 18. They are among the 115 Union County residents to take part in the free heart health screening and risk assessment offered at the medical center.

Charles Warner | The Union Times There was a long line in the main lobby of the Union Medical Center on the morning of Feb. 18 during Statewide Screening Day. The event provided Union County residents with the opportunity to get a free heart health screening and risk assessment. The goal of the event was to educate the public about the realities of heart disease and methods of preventing and managing it. A total of 115 people underwent free heart health screenings and risk assessments at the medical center.
http://uniondailytimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/web1_Screening-4.jpgCharles Warner | The Union Times There was a long line in the main lobby of the Union Medical Center on the morning of Feb. 18 during Statewide Screening Day. The event provided Union County residents with the opportunity to get a free heart health screening and risk assessment. The goal of the event was to educate the public about the realities of heart disease and methods of preventing and managing it. A total of 115 people underwent free heart health screenings and risk assessments at the medical center.

Charles Warner | The Union Times Lori Boyd, RN, uses a finger nick to obtain a blood sample from Nancy O’Dell to be used to check O’Dell’s cholesterol at the Union Medical Center during Statewide Screening Day. The Feb. 18 event was designed to provide local residents with the opportunity to undergo free health screenings and risk assessments as part of an effort to educate the public about heart disease. A total of 115 people underwent free heart health screenings and risk assessments at the medical center.
http://uniondailytimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/web1_Screening-5.jpgCharles Warner | The Union Times Lori Boyd, RN, uses a finger nick to obtain a blood sample from Nancy O’Dell to be used to check O’Dell’s cholesterol at the Union Medical Center during Statewide Screening Day. The Feb. 18 event was designed to provide local residents with the opportunity to undergo free health screenings and risk assessments as part of an effort to educate the public about heart disease. A total of 115 people underwent free heart health screenings and risk assessments at the medical center.

Charles Warner | The Union Times Juliet Okebe, BSN, takes Bobbie Jean Belue’s blood pressure during the Statewide Screening Day at Union Medical Center on Feb. 18. Belue was among the 115 Union County residents to take part in the free heart health screening and risk assessment offered at the medical center.
http://uniondailytimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/web1_Screening-2.jpgCharles Warner | The Union Times Juliet Okebe, BSN, takes Bobbie Jean Belue’s blood pressure during the Statewide Screening Day at Union Medical Center on Feb. 18. Belue was among the 115 Union County residents to take part in the free heart health screening and risk assessment offered at the medical center.
Undergo free heart health screenings

By Charles Warner

cwarner@civitasmedia.com

Charles Warner can be reached at 864-762-4090 or cwarner@civitasmedia.com.

Charles Warner can be reached at 864-762-4090 or cwarner@civitasmedia.com.

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