Foods with high levels of sodium


Flavorful, spicy alternatives to salt

Breads & Rolls


Cold Cuts & Cured Meats


Pizza


Poultry


Soup


Sandwiches


SPARTANBURG — The American Heart Association recommends that you aim to eat less than 1,500 mg of sodium per day, but according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention the following six popular foods can add high levels of sodium to your diet:

Bread & Rolls

Some foods that you eat several times a day, such as bread, add up to a lot of sodium even though each serving may not seem high in sodium. Check the labels to find lower-sodium varieties.

Cold Cuts & Cured Meats

One 2 oz. serving, or 6 thin slices, of deli meat can contain as much as half of your daily recommended dietary sodium. Look for lower-sodium varieties of your favorite lunch meats.

Pizza

A slice of pizza with several toppings can contain more than half of your daily recommended dietary sodium. Limit the cheese and add more veggies to your next slice.

Poultry

Sodium levels in poultry can vary based on preparation methods. You will find a wide range of sodium in poultry products, so it is important to choose wisely.

Soup

Sodium in one cup of canned soup can range from 100 to as much as much at 940 milligrams — more than half of your daily recommended intake. Check the labels to find lower sodium varieties.

Sandwiches

A sandwich or burger from a fast food restaurant can contain more than 100 percent of your daily suggested dietary sodium. Try half a sandwich with a side salad instead.

Alternatives

These are some alternatives to put in your “salt” shaker:

• Salt-less Surprise

2 tsp garlic powder

1 tsp Basil

1 tsp oregano

1 tsp lemon rind (or dehydrated lemon juice)

• Spicy Salt-less Seasoning

1 tsp cloves

1 tsp pepper

1 tsp coriander

1 tsp paprika

1 tbsp rosemary

• Pungent Salt Substitute

3 tsp basil

2 tsp savory

2 tsp celery seed

2 tsp cumin

2 tsp sage

2 tsp marjoram

1 tsp lemon thyme

• Herb Blend

1 tbsp marjoram

1 tbsp parsley flakes

2 tsp basil

1 tsp tarragon

1 tsp dill

Flavor Guide

Here’s a guide to what to use to get a meaty, salty, and sweet flavors in your food:

• Meaty — to suggest meaty flavor in foods, try adding sage, thyme, fennel, rosemary, garlic, onions, and vinegar.

• Salt — for a “salty” taste, try celery seed, garlic, parsley, lemon juice, and hot spice such as chili powder and cayenne pepper.

• Sweet — when you want to sweeten food without the calories, try adding vanilla extract, almond spice, cardamon, nutmeg, mace, mint, ginger or cinnamon.

Other Spice Suggestions

• Mexican — chili powder, cumin, cilantro, oregano

• Oriental — ginger, rice, vinegar, fennel, curry powder, cilantro, hot mustard powder, horseradish, garlic, cayenne

• French — tarragon, nutmeg, chervil, wine

• Italian — oregano, basil, fennel, rosemary, onion, garlic, parsley, red pepper, wine, vinegar

• Indian — curry powder, cumin, coriander, turmeric, garlic, saffron, mint, cinnamon, cardamom, lemon, dill, paprika, black pepper, vinegar

Breads & Rolls
http://uniondailytimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/web1_Bread-Rolls.jpgBreads & Rolls

Cold Cuts & Cured Meats
http://uniondailytimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/web1_Cold-Cuts-Cured-Meats.jpgCold Cuts & Cured Meats

Pizza
http://uniondailytimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/web1_Pizza.jpgPizza

Poultry
http://uniondailytimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/web1_Poultry.jpgPoultry

Soup
http://uniondailytimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/web1_Soup.jpgSoup

Sandwiches
http://uniondailytimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/web1_Sandwiches.jpgSandwiches
Flavorful, spicy alternatives to salt

This information was provided by the Spartanburg Regional Healthcare System.

This information was provided by the Spartanburg Regional Healthcare System.

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